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Adriano Zumbo's Patissier, The Star Sydney

Adriano Zumbo P√Ętissier on Urbanspoon



Macarons are referred to as Zumbarons. The sushi train concept has been transfromed into a dessert conveyor belt instead, where customers can sit and watch, making into reality sugar and pastry dreams of childhood past. The latest outlet of Adriano Zumbo's at the revamped food street from the Star Casino in Sydney shines like a lit up Ferris wheel, cleverly tucked away at one corner, suggesting of an elegant uniqueness and yet with a welcoming air. The displays, inside or outside the shop, are what attracted me in the very first place, with key products delicately placed to capture our attention and captivate our hearts.
There are always new flavours to complement past favourites for Zumbarons. I especially like the salted butter caramel and the fingerbun versions. One bite into such macarons - and I realise how much thought and creativity has gone into formulating the taste, texture and sensation of the outcome. Zumbo knows we cannot take too much of such rich delights, but every savoured result on our palate is worth the choice. I also sampled the lychee, hot cross bun, passion/tonka and the watermelon plus orange varieties.



Zumbo's creative pursuits and results are also reflected in the careful and yet fun choice of
names for the gateaux - like Man Goes Peanuts, Grandma's Soap and Tastes Like Doris.





I love the plain croissants best, although Zumbo has almond and chocolate versions available.
He has carried on the practice of transparency in his baking labs, with clear glass windows emphasising on safety, skills and superbness. Also on offer are cakes, quiche, danish and various concoctions of breads like chorizo, multigrains, ciabatta, olive and rosemary plus wholemeal.


You can also drop by Zumbo's other outlets in Manly, Rozelle and Balmain in the outer Sydney suburbs. My overall impressions at Zumbo's at the Star in Sydney's Darling Harbour are:
Atmosphere: Fun like in a Fair
Location: Good for non-Gamblers but can be Touristy
Taste: Allows You Choice
People Engagement: With a Smile
Service: Quick and Focused
Best Time to Visit: Afternoon Tea
My Fav Dish Experienced: Salted Butter Caramel Zumbaron
Would I Return?: Definitely.

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